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Ron English Taps Into His Childhood for Upcoming “TOYBOX” Exhibit


Visit the original post to see all 4 images from this gallery.

Pop-art visionary Ron English is set to open his new exhibit “TOYBOX: America in the Visuals,” in Los Angeles on December 2.

The “TOYBOX” exhibition is his latest body of work deploying Roy’s long established visual vocabulary into multi-layered narratives of ambition and imagination. Featuring 36 new oil paintings, as well as sculptures and other installations, “TOYBOX” examines the creation of the self, and thus the greater society, as an act of imagination, a skill developed in childhood largely through the activity of play and the use of toys. Toys introduce a codified visual narrative of the individual and the archetypes that construct the collective narrative that is the underpinning of society.

Ron, is one of the most prolific and recognizable artists alive, and widely considered the Godfather of Street Art and Seminal Pioneer of Pop Surrealism. He’s commonly known for his culture jamming public art campaigns, including his “Abraham Obama” art and “Bowery Mural” in NYC. Accompanied with the exhibit, English has also co-produced a musical soundtrack to be performed by new character DJ Popaganda. The exhibition will also include a new outdoor mural and a pop-up store selling Ron’s limited-edition toys. Check out a few exhibit images in the gallery above.

The opening reception for “TOYBOX” will be hosted Saturday, December 2 from 7-11 p.m. in Gallery 1 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public and on view through December 30.

Also, check out Ron English’s final edition of his iconic “Charlie Grin” series for their 10th anniversary.



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